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 Arbroath's Official District Tartan - Red Lichtie  
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theTartanArtisan
Wee Haggis


theTartanArtisan

Arbroath, Scotland
4 Posts
Last here:
24 Oct 2012
Posted - 24 Oct 2012 :  1:08:00 PM Show Profile Visit theTartanArtisan's HomepageSend theTartanArtisan a Private Message Reply with Quote
Announcing the new official district tartan for Arbroath - Red Lichtie. A Tartan to represent the 'Clan of Arbroath' ...And a tartan to not only lift the spirit of Arbroath, but to also send out a positive message to everyone in Scotland, and overseas, who appreciates the unifying power in our tartans! Adopted by the Royal Burgh of Arbroath Community Council, on 5th October 2012. Read the historical references behind the origin of the name on my website - www.theTartanArtisan.com. Like the facebook page to get news & updates, and to add your own feedback.

Many thanks,

Steve
www.facebook.com/theTartanArtisan

Press coverage this week!


TartanJunkie
keptie
Senior Smokie


Scotland
886 Posts
Last here:
4 days ago
Posted - 02 Apr 2013 :  4:45:17 PM Show Profile Visit keptie's HomepageSend keptie a Private Message Reply with Quote
See that the Courier for 2nd April 2013 has a photo of Steve Sim in the new RED LICHTIE TARTAN KILT at Hospitalfield in Arbroath and that he has had 15 kilts initially ordered and 10 sold and one has gone to a man in Canada . Hes had several requests too for hats , upholstery , blinds and even curtains using that same Red Lichtie tartan

Orders for the kilts can be placed at Christie's Fine Art in Lordburn in Arbroath which is run by Steve's mother, the artist Sheena Christie

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keptie
keith
Master Smokie


United Kingdom
2714 Posts
Last here:
04 Jun 2017
Posted - 03 Apr 2013 :  07:51:32 AM Show ProfileSend keith a Private Message Reply with Quote
I believe in being proud of your heritage , but I thought tartans were a mark of clans or regiments and proudly adorned, but not asscoiated with places.
Does that mean all towns will have a tartan in time to come, are we really going down that road.
Terrymac
Master Smokie


Terrymac

United Kingdom
2440 Posts
Last here:
04 Jan 2019
Posted - 03 Apr 2013 :  10:39:38 AM Show Profile Visit Terrymac's HomepageSend Terrymac a Private Message Reply with Quote
Hi Keith, Tartans were associated with areas long before clans and regiments lay claim to tartan designs.

Historically patterns of tartans were usually associated with where they were woven. Not with the forces or clans. In about 1800 Wilsons of Bannockburn had a pattern book of various “Tartans” which were associated with cities and towns. They had applied the names to tartans where they had sold well or indeed where they had been obtained from. It appears that there is no other reason to link a particular pattern with an area or place. Present and past day usage linked these tartans with the “district” such that local people or people with links to the district, and indeed visitors who wanted a memento, could buy the tartan.
However, over the next 300 years new tartans have come on the market and a resurgence in the 1960’s even brought back the Glasgow Tartan.
Scottish clans, usually named after the leader, wanted their own tartan. Indeed after the 1715/45 rebellions tartans were banned from being worn by the "common people” for a while. Only personages loyal to the "Crown" could wear tartan.
After the union of the crowns (Scotland/England) the British army introduced tartans for their Scottish Regiments.


Terrymac
I have only one voice but I still strive to make a difference.
keith
Master Smokie


United Kingdom
2714 Posts
Last here:
04 Jun 2017
Posted - 03 Apr 2013 :  6:43:48 PM Show ProfileSend keith a Private Message Reply with Quote
That may well be the case Terry but Iv'e yet to meet a person " actually wearing " a placename tartan , most folk are surname or military orientated, unless of course the surnames tartans originate from the placenames.
Terrymac
Master Smokie


Terrymac

United Kingdom
2440 Posts
Last here:
04 Jan 2019
Posted - 03 Apr 2013 :  11:16:58 PM Show Profile Visit Terrymac's HomepageSend Terrymac a Private Message Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by keith

That may well be the case Terry but Iv'e yet to meet a person " actually wearing " a placename tartan , most folk are surname or military orientated, unless of course the surnames tartans originate from the placenames.



Totally agree with what you say for "nowadays"... my point being, as your last statement, a lot of "district" tartans were adopted by clans/their surnames.. The new government register of tartans is here :- http://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/search.aspx

It is quite interesting to explore.. for example Rattray has three family/clan tartans registered... None have reference to district.. but the earliest was only registered in 1825.

However one of many Argyll tartans.. Argyll being both a surname and the name of an old Scottish county, Argyllshire.... W & S Smith records this pattern as claimed by Cawdor Campbell. There is also a reference to this Argyll tartan in a letter of 1798. W and A K Johnston who call it the Argyll District tartan. and was said to have been adopted by the MacCorquodales.

Baically what I am trying to say is that "district" tartans were in Scotland before Clan and Military tartans.
Until approx. middle of the nineteenth century, the highland tartans were only associated with either regions or districts, rather than any specific clan. This was because like other materials tartan designs were produced by local weavers for local tastes and would normally only use the natural dyes available in that area, (chemical dye production non-existent) Transportation of other dye materials across long distances being prohibitively expensive. see : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartan ... This gives a concise history.

The industrial revolution changed the original way of producing tartans locally and all the district weavers virtually disappeared overnight because the large weaving firms could manufacture many tartans under one roof for everyone.. also adding the benefit of being much cheaper, better quality and able to supply quantity (for say dress uniform kilts).

There have been many "new design" tartans (in the hundreds) registered by districts and councils, individuals, families and firms over the past few years. To my mind this is good for Scotland and this may be the point we disagree on Keith. A' the best..big grin


Terrymac
I have only one voice but I still strive to make a difference.
keith
Master Smokie


United Kingdom
2714 Posts
Last here:
04 Jun 2017
Posted - 04 Apr 2013 :  05:42:17 AM Show ProfileSend keith a Private Message Reply with Quote
A tad " lang winded" Terry but I cant argue with your homework or as they say in Monty Python ( what have the Romans ever given us ? )
stelajohn
Wee Haggis


stelajohn

USA
2 Posts
Last here:
02 Jan 2019
Posted - 02 Jan 2019 :  7:44:36 PM Show Profile Visit stelajohn's HomepageSend stelajohn a Private Message Reply with Quote
AWesome

Tartan Fabric | Different Colors and Patterns
https://scottishkiltshop.com/tartan-fabric.html
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